When Should I Start Golden Retriever Behavior Training

When Should I Start Golden Retriever Behavior Training?

golden retriever behavior trainingDog behavior training should begin as soon as you bring a new GOLDEN RETRIEVER DOG or puppy home, and after you’ve given him some loving, shown him around and allowed him to become acclimated to his new home and yard. Keep in mind however, that golden retrievers are much like people, and sometimes, their attention spans will be limited.

When it comes to training your Golden retriever, you should be the one to train him. After all, you’re the one closest to him; you know his habits, likes and dislikes, and you, above all others, know how he responds to certain situations. Is he anxious to please and obey? Is he skittish and afraid? Begin immediately to reinforce praise and affection for your golden retriever dog when he responds in an appropriate manner to your commands.

Never abuse or punish your golden retriever dog while teaching him basic commands like ‘sit’ and ‘stay’. Keep lessons brief, and focus on one command at a time. Be prepared to reward progress with a golden retrievergie biscuit or other treat, always accompanied by plenty of praise. A number of good books on golden retriever training can be found at libraries and bookstores, as well as video and DVD media. If you’ve already mastered the basic commands and want your golden retriever to learn how to socialize with other DOGS and people, you may consider taking him to a DOG training session offered by your local pet store, or even to the park, where he can learn, slowly, to interact with all kinds of different, and sometimes difficult, situations.

Start with placing a golden retriever dog on a leash while still in your yard, and keep distractions to a minimum. Practice walking in large circles, stopping occasionally to offer commands. Gently show the golden retriever what you want him to do. If you would like him to sit, place your hand gently on his rump and press down while keeping his head up. Never jerk your golden retriever or punish him for not understanding what you want him to do. The fault may lay with you. Preface a command with his or her name and then use one word to convey that command. Instruct other family members not to add to your training efforts, and when they give commands, to give them in the same way in which you have trained your golden retriever.

When trying to teach your golden retriever dog to avoid certain behaviors, convey a firm ‘No’. Don’t spank, jerk his leash or otherwise abuse your golden retriever. Remember, he is relying on you to keep him safe and healthy. Most golden retrievers know when their owners aren’t pleased with them, and will make an effort to change, if they know what it is you expect of them. That’s your job, to teach with patience, kindness and understanding.

Never expect your golden retriever to ‘get it’ in one training session, any more than you were able to understand your first geometry lesson. Golden Retrievers absorb lessons and experiences at different rates, and some breeds learn faster than others. Some breeds seem well acclimated to learning more than just basic commands, and can be trained to perform in DOG shows, as well as golden retrievergie athletic events that include climbing and balancing feats of skill.

Patience is the key to properly training a golden retriever of any age. If you have bought an older golden retriever from a pound, you may have to show extra persistence in breaking bad habits, and if the golden retriever has been abused, your task will be made doubly difficult. However, loving patience, ample praise and rewards usually manage to do the trick within a few days, so keep at it.


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