How To Stop My Golden Retriever From Fighting With Other DOGS

How To Stop My Golden Retriever From Fighting With Other DOGS

How To Stop My Golden Retriever from Fighting with OtherIf you have a golden retriever with some behavior or territorial issues, you may have your work cut out for you when it comes to teaching your golden retriever to stop fighting with other DOGS. Keep in mind before you go any further, that in many cases, aggressive behavior in a golden retriever is a result of fear.

Work with your golden retriever, first on obedience basics, using commands such as sit, stay, heel, and ‘no’. Don’t punish your golden retriever, though reinforce and reward good behavior. When that step has been accomplished, take your golden retriever out for walks along quiet neighborhood streets where interaction with other people or DOGS isn’t likely. Get your golden retriever used to being around others, without them being too close.

Carry DOG treats in your pocket to immediately reward your golden retriever for good behavior and responding to your commands. When approaching other DOGS or people, place yourself between your golden retriever and others. Grasp the leash tightly and pull the DOG leash sideways as the DOG approaches, keeping your golden retriever at a distance. Pulling his or her leash sideways will keep your golden retriever unbalanced, while allowing you greater control.

Carry something that will distract your golden retriever when he or she sees another DOG approaching, but don’t yell or scold your golden retriever to behave before the other people even near you. Maintain an even pace, always talking to your golden retriever in low, soothing tones, and urge him to respond to you instead of approaching DOGS or people. Reward him or her immediately with a treat when he makes eye contact with you.

Other people dealing with difficult situations like golden retriever aggression often introduce their golden retriever to a passive pooch in a new location. This will alleviate any need for territoriality with your golden retriever, and the non-aggressive temperament of the other golden retriever may serve to teach your golden retriever that others golden retrievers don’t always imply a threat. Of course, have the other golden retriever owner holding tightly to their golden retriever and remain calm and unthreatening as well.

Be aware of the first signs or signals of aggression in your golden retriever toward others. Staring at an approaching DOG or person, hackles raised, and stiff legs and tail should alert you that your golden retriever is in an aggressive mode. Calmly give the approaching DOGS or people plenty of room while speaking to your golden retriever in upbeat and soothing tones, and then reward your golden retriever after the brief meeting has passed.

The key to changing any behavior in a golden retriever is patience. New lessons won’t be learned overnight, and may take days, or even weeks, to see signs of progress. Reassure your golden retriever that he or she is loved and make sure you lavish them with plenty of attention after each outing. However, if your golden retriever continues to express aggressive behavior after all attempts by you to correct such behavior have failed, consider taking your golden retriever to an obedience class that specializes in aggressive golden retriever behavior.





 

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